Long Distance Caregiving

Long Distance Caregiving

Caregiving in-person can be physically exhausting.  Caregiving long distance can be mentally tortuous.

When you are responsible for a loved one (or feel you should be) and you cannot see first-hand what the situation is, it can be very stressful. You may call and your Dad does not answer.  You know he “should be there”, but he is not answering the phone. He could have fallen and injured himself – or he could be enjoying a cookout with the neighbors. Or he just forgot to plug in his cellphone. You can only allow yourself so many police wellness-checks before your welcome is worn out at the local constabulary.

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Hoarding by the Elderly

Hoarding by the Elderly

When a family caregiver is called upon to help with an elderly loved one, occasionally he or she runs into an unexpected situation – hoarding.  Hoarding is relatively common among the elderly and tends to get worse with advancing age.  Clutter and unsanitary conditions can severely hamper the ability for a senior to live independently.

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Rejecting Ageism

Rejecting Ageism

As a society, we quickly recognize overt prejudice.  Disparaging comments about skin color, national origin and religion are patently unacceptable.  Yet, seemingly innocuous comments to the elderly about their age do not raise much indignation.

Being referred to as an “Old Geezer”, for example — even with a wink, begets a stereotype that defines ageism.  Such a prejudicial generalization assumes that older adults are inherently prone to being weak, forgetful or sickly.  And, it is not just younger people who may carelessly express such disparaging remarks, but, sadly, people whose jobs it is to care for the elderly – including medical professionals.

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